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Attny response of me Using Land Trust & Simul. Close

Home Forums General EHTrust/EHT Topics and Creative Real Estate Financing Attny response of me Using Land Trust & Simul. Close

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  • #4133
    Avatar of restequi
    restequi
    Member

    The Short Sale Scam

    The Players:

    A “savior” who is a party with cash or access to cash, looking to make a fast, very
    high return in his investment.

    A property owner in financial trouble who is trying to forestall foreclosure by any
    available mean.

    A real estate broker or agent who is generally connected to the savior through
    business or family ties and who stands to make commissions on the savior’s sales
    of properties.

    A closing attorney who is willing to look the other way and do what is necessary
    to close for the buyer.

    The Scheme

    The savior advertises throughout the community in a manner calculated to reach
    homeowners in financial distress. In some instances, these saviors monitor foreclosure
    activity and contact the defendants directly, offering their “services”. The pitch is that
    they can save the house from foreclosure by selling it, thereby saving the homeowners’
    credit, getting them out from under the mortgage and sometimes generating a little cash
    for the homeowners.

    The savior then persuades the homeowners to convey the property to him, either directly
    or “as trustee”, often representing to them that they will be allowed to remain in the
    property. The savior will then immediately list the property for sale with the broker, who
    sometimes already has a buyer waiting, often at full fair market value.

    The rest of the scheme, where the mortgage fraud occurs, happens in one of two ways.
    The savior may contact the lender directly, holding himself out as a representative of the
    homeowners. He negotiates a “short sale” payoff for the mortgage by deliberately
    misrepresenting the purchase price under the new purchase and sale agreement.
    Often,
    there will be a “dummy contract” submitted to the lender, showing a lower price.

    Under a variation of this scheme, the savior or his attorney contacts the lender,
    representing that the savior is the buyer for a much lower purchase price than the actual
    contract. A short sale will be negotiated on the basis of the savior’s “purchase price”,
    although the savior already holds title and took it for no consideration.

    If the lender decides to go along with the short sale rather than pursue the foreclosure, a
    payoff letter will be generated for an amount that is less than what is owed, but for which
    the lender is willing to settle and release the mortgage. Many of these payoff letters
    reflect the sales transaction as it has been presented to the lender. While most contain a
    dollar figure the lender is willing to settle for, some require that the entire net proceeds of
    the transaction as reflected on the HUD-1 be paid to the lender. The lower payoff figure
    in the context of the real fair market value purchase price can result in a substantial
    amount of cash coming back to the seller at closing, which is not disclosed to the lender.

    Depending on what the short payoff letter requires, the savior may “close” with the
    homeowner on the deal presented to the lender, using the short payoff letter to clear the
    title and generating a HUD-1 that shows all money from the “closing” going to the
    lender. The savior will simultaneously go to closing with the real buyer to generate the money that will actually be used to payoff the mortgage.

    The savior then pockets the
    money from the closing as a “fee” for helping the owner avoid the foreclosure.
    In some cases, the savior will request the buyer’s attorney to “fold” the transactions
    together, so that the HUD-1 reflects the homeowners as the sellers, with a commission 01
    fee being paid to the savior for “services rendered”. The commission is often half or all
    of the net proceeds left after payoff to the lender and payment of the other expenses of
    the seller. Where the net proceeds are to be paid over to the lender, it will be a flat fee in
    a substantial amount, that will show as a^seller’s cost on the HUD-1.

    The Victims:

    The lender who has agreed to settle its foreclosure action for less than the full
    amount of the debt owed on the basis of fraudulent information. The real closing
    often generates enough cash to pay the loan off in full.

    The homeowner who may be left subject to a deficiency action on the promissory
    note, and who lost all or a substantial portion of the equity in their home to the
    “savior”. Without the interference of the savior, the homeowner might have been
    able to sell their property, pay off their mortgage and walk away with some
    money.

    How To Detect:
    Be wary of any closing transaction in which a third party claims to have negotiated a
    short mortgage payoff for the seller. Never close without a written payoff on the
    letterhead of the mortgage holder. Scrutinize the payoff letter. If it isn’t based on the
    terms of your closing, particularly the purchase price the buyer is paying, don’t close. If
    you have any doubts about what the lender was told, call the lender. Remember, if a
    fraud is perpetrated on the lender and is discovered, the mortgage will not be released and
    the foreclosure action might be recommenced.
    Never agree to prepare a HUD-1 that reflects anything other than the closing transaction
    that will actually occur.

    CONCLUSION
    Mortgage fraud has far-reaching consequences. For borrowers, it can be disastrous, resulting in
    loan default, foreclosure and loss of their homes and credit ratings. Many will never recover
    their ability to buy a home. For lenders who are victimized by dishonest brokers, appraisers and
    real estate agents, fraud can mean higher rates of default and forced repurchases of loans sold to
    warehouse lenders and secondary-market investors. Many such lenders have already been
    bankrupted and shuttered; others are on a “watch list”. Nationwide, lenders have been forced to
    withdraw from the sub prime market, which has been the largest source of funding for low
    income homebuyers and homeowners. A significant segment of the American population is
    currently unable to access mortgage money to buy a piece of the American dream.

    How can I debate this ? I have even said what if my name appears on nothing in the trust..
    I also said what if I close 2st with hard money ..
    I have also said can you show me the law against it.. she stormed off mad it seemed and said i dont have time for this..

    I need this ammo in order to reinforce my beliefs and posture as an investor versus some one getting sued for FRAUD..

    How can I make sure this is solved for my protection and debate this lawyer..?

    The last thing id want is to get nailed for FRAUD.. I need feedback..

    #23486

    Depending on a couple other factors the Attorney may be 100% correct. I know there are a few organizations that sell courses on doing just what you have outlined. Title Companies and Attorneys are being cautioned by State and Federal Officials regarding the use of Land Trusts, not just in Short Sale situations but any transaction. When one jackass uses what they think is a valid Land Trust and it results in some type of fraud, it makes it bad for the rest of us, Narsonians especially, who want to do the “Exactly Right” thing.

    One thing is for sure. When attempting to negotiate a Short Sale where you can pick it up for one price from the lender and flip it to an end buyer for a profit, you need to do it right. The way the Title Companies and Lenders want you to do it and they are instructed by State and Federal Officials as well as the Lenders to do it is…

    You must first take title to the property by either Cash (Hard Money) or Credit, hold it for at least 90 days and then you can resell it. You may not, under any circumstances, use an End Buyers Cash or Credit to fund your deal.

    So this stuff about “Clearing the HUD” and showing that you took title is bogus, and there in lies the problem.

    Yes, there are some Title Companies that will do what you have proposed and do a Double Closing or Simultainious Closing, but not if you are using the End Buyers funds or financing to fund your deal. Most certainly the Lender on the other end of the Short Sale won’t allow it. And since Full Disclosure is the key to any successful transaction, your screwed.

    So, how do you fix it or make it work with Full Disclosure and with the blessings of all parties, including Buyers, Sellers, Lenders, Title Companies and especially those pesky Attorneys?

    First you have to find a Title Company or Attorney that knows their stuff and is willing to work with you. Even if you are right, some of them are idiots.

    When attempting a Short Sale (and I have done this many times), the first thing I do is get the property in trust, with you as a beneficiary, not the Trustee. This does a few things. One; it locks up the property so no other “Investors” can come in a cut you out or make a better offer to the owner. Why, because now the Trustee is the owner. Two; it prevents any other encumbrances from being placed on the property from other creditors etc.

    Next, using a complete Short Sale package (made up of 8 documents), not the one the Lender provides to you, you know negotiate your terms. Or do what I do and hire a Short Sale specialist to do it for you for a fee. I truely believe in Outsourcing.

    During this period of between several weeks to many months, you of course are planning your exit strategy. It may be to resell or may be hold on to it yourself and put an RB in to it.

    Once you have reached your terms with the lender and you have all “YOUR” financing in place, you can set a closing date. Yes, you can do two seperate transactions on the same day, at the same Title Company or Attorney’s office.

    Just a side note here: Is this jaskass Attorney of yours saying that you are not allowed to purchase a property from a Seller with the Lenders permission on a Short Sale and turn around and sell it to someone else for a profit, regardless of the time frame? What the hell do they think you are going to do with it, live in it yourself? The Attorney is just pissed because you are smarter then they are.

    What I do is use Hard Money and pay off the Short Sale. Since it is in trust it remains in trust. And since there are no seasoning issues with lenders with regard to placing ones property in Trust you can easily sell the property from the trust after you pay off the Short Sale without the End Buyers Lender getting all bent out of shape. There are two seperate transactions. One of you paying off the loan and one of the Trust now selling the property. Each with full disclosure.

    #23487
    Avatar of jerry carey
    jerry carey
    Member

    Scott … what you just posted above seems to me to be the correct and legal way of doing Short Sales. The only reason I’m posting this message is that it seems to contradict what you said in your previous post:

    http://site.landtrust.net/board/viewtopic.php?t=4891&highlight=flip

    you said:

    I am now applying this same type of transactions to Foreclosures and Short Sales so I never have to use my own financing or Credit Partner. I just negotiate a SS with the Lender after the property is placed in Trust and find an End Buyer to fund it. Works exactly like the old Simultainious Closings but without any seasoning issues and the Lender doesn’t care.

    Jerry Carey

    #23488

    Good observation, but things do and have changed somewhat. I’m finding fewer and fewer Title Companies, because of lenders, that will allow me to do it without using my own funds, including my own. And since I now have a very cheap source of Hard Money funds, it’s not really an issue.

    One of the other things that helps is that I can now close any and all my transactions with my local Title Company. I never have to go explain anything or convince an Attorney of what we are doing. I just walked back in from a closing of a property in Texas. I never had to talk to the Title Company there. I closed it all on my end here.

    If you can get in good with a Land America Title Office then you can do it too. They have a Mobile Notary Service that just goes out and gets the docs all signed and you can close with your local office. All LA offices are not alike but all you need is one. And, if you find one and they need answers to feel comfortable with what you are doing, they can call one of their offices that does.

    #23489
    Avatar of jerry carey
    jerry carey
    Member

    Thanks for the clarification Scott … I assumed times had changed but wanted to be sure of the right way to approach doing these types of transactions.

    Just one other question that I have is:

    If the property is already in the name of the trust … how do you get financing? Usually, the property has to be taken out of the trust’s name and put back into the name of the Beneficiary to be financed and then transferred back into the trust’s name. How do you accomplish this in the case of a Short Sale scenario?

    Thanks in advance for your help.

    Jerry Carey

    #23490
    Avatar of restequi
    restequi
    Member

    So the only way to do this is to completely close and fund the deal myself first, either with hard money, typical financing, or cash. Are you also saying that I have to hold the property for 90 days. Is this the minimum? Why 90 days and not less ? Like an hour two.. And why not the simultaneous closing?

    Is there a law against this were specific statute that I don???t know about? How exactly is my Atty Telling you this is FRAUD, or what part of its Fraud..? Is it the illegal to get the buyers funds to close the deal? Or is a illeagal because you???re discounting in flipping the property.. I???m just trying to figure out which part is actually fraud here..

    Now when you mentioned full disclosure, what disclosures or documents are you pertaining to.?

    I know as a realtor, I am supposed to disclose this, and also than I am an investor doing this for profit..

    What other disclosures would I need exactly here ?

    So you say get the property into a trust with me as the beneficiary? How about the homeowners are they also beneficiary? So who would be the trustee in this transaction?.. What happens to the assignment of beneficial interest and all that stuff..?

    So from here you are getting a short sale package together for the lender.. And how are you negotiating so call to terms or purchase price..? Are you writing a purchase and sales agreement for the amount you???re willing to pay and have the owners sign it..? If not what method do you use to extract this price that they will accept? So maybe you???ll counter back and forth a couple times with the lender and finally arrive in at a price that the lender will accept.. If you are writing an offer / P&S what do you put for closing time frame 30 days 60 days 90 days etc.. And how about a deadline for the bank???s acceptance? Should this also be used ? Unless you???re using another method besides an offer and P&S somehow informally.. I get confused here a little on how this is actually done extracting the price or lowball offer, please elaborate on negotiate the terms and the essence of the offer or discount method either informal for formal, P&S, or just cover letter please explain..

    I am now getting up with a short sale specialists who is supposed to negotiate these SS???s for me but I haven???t spoke to him as of yet..

    So if you have your financing in place, cash or, hard money to actually close on.. are you Saying , You then can resell the same day in this situation.. Without the 90 day minimum before you can sell???
    Okay for the documents regarding the trust, & the homeowner deeding the property into a trust. So all that???s needed is the trust and the deed?

    Are you saying that to trust sells to me the end buyer with funding how then do I resell with no seasoning.. Or is it that there is a purchase by me of the trust with traditional funding, and a P&S, or bill of sale.. Please expain this part you wrote for me also.. ??? One of you paying off the loan and one of the Trust now selling the property.
    Each with full disclosure.??? (What Disclosure..?)

    Thank you guys Scott & Jerry – so much for contributing to a this post this important information will be very useful to other investors as well as ourselves to CYA and steer clear of FRAUD charges..
    Thanks again Scott for your detailed post.. Sounds like you are very educated in this art of SSing..

    Please be kind enough to fill in the Blanks for me of my further questions this is very much appreciated by myself and all of us here at REICLUB..
    I urge all club members to contribute their knowledge, experience, and comments for the benefit of all investors in this changing marketplace and prohibiting regulations against us professional real estate investors.
    Where would the bank???s be without the investors creating WIN-WIN-WIN scenarios on an inevitable foreclosure outcome..

    Thanks to all who have generously contributed to my post..

    Mohegan

    #23491
    Avatar of jerry carey
    jerry carey
    Member

    Mohegan:

    You stated you are a Realtor … and thus I assume you have good understanding of how Real Estate transactions work! However, you are venturing into two very specialized areas of R.E., trying to merge the two, and it’s apperant that you don’t understand the basics of either specialty.

    You said you getting in contact with a Short Sale specialist … that’s great and a good way to learn these types of transactions!

    As far as Land Trusts, especially EHTrusts through NARs, you need to do your own homework or due dilligence! Attend the 2-1/2 day seminar by NARS and become a member or at LEAST buy the Quick Start Success Package! Everything that you asked in your posts will be revealed to you if you read the books and listen to the CD’s :!:

    Jerry Carey

    #23492
    Avatar of restequi
    restequi
    Member

    I have already taken the 2.5 day event.. firstly..
    However I am an experienced Realtor and Investor and understand the concept well.. However in my post i mentioned my encounter with a closing attny and her recent response to what I/ other investor are doing..
    I had a few minor questions to fill in the blanks that i figured would and could be answered and communicated by other knowledgable likeminded investors who may wish to clarify this issue and comment in more detal for all to benefit.. Not to tell us to spend 1000′s more on education materials when I only have a few questions needing answered. Im all for education dont get me wrong, but Ive invested plenty and studied all aspects of investing form all gurus.. Now is the time to do some deals and make some money so then i can get whatever courses i chose to spend some investing profits on to empower me further..

    I appreciate all suggestions, comments, that actually help answer our questions or new arizings – other then buy another course and read some more.. this donet help much.. cuz we all know this.. and there would be no need for a discussion forum.. Thanks anyways..

    #23493

    @restequi wrote:

    So the only way to do this is to completely close and fund the deal myself first, either with hard money, typical financing, or cash.

    No, I’m not saying it is the only way but, it is the most accepted way with Lenders and Title Companies. Even with my own Title Co. it has been over a years since they allowed me to close my whole deal using just the End Buyers funds or financing. The Title Companies are getting pressure from the Lenders and State Regulators to not allow that practice.

    @restequi wrote:

    Are you also saying that I have to hold the property for 90 days. Is this the minimum? Why 90 days and not less ? Like an hour two.. And why not the simultaneous closing?

    HUD requirements are a min of 90 days. However, most lenders are taking a hint from HUD and requiring the same thing. There are still lenders who do not require 90 seasoning of title before you can resell. However, there is a higher price to pay for no seasoning.

    @restequi wrote:

    Is there a law against this were specific statute that I don???t know about? How exactly is my Atty Telling you this is FRAUD, or what part of its Fraud..? Is it the illegal to get the buyers funds to close the deal? Or is a illeagal because you???re discounting in flipping the property.. I???m just trying to figure out which part is actually fraud here..

    Here’s what I do know. The FBI has assigned two dozen agents to Utah, just to put a halt to this practice. I have asked and not one person, including an FBI Agent has been able to find a specific law prohibiting this practice. This reminds me of another unwitten law that requires you and me to pay a federal income tax. I guess they figured that we fell for that one so we’ll give in and fall for this one too.

    @restequi wrote:

    Now when you mentioned full disclosure, what disclosures or documents are you pertaining to.? I know as a realtor, I am supposed to disclose this, and also than I am an investor doing this for profit.. What other disclosures would I need exactly here ?

    Two seperate sales, two seperate closes. Straight Up. You have full disclosure in the first sale and then full disclosure of the second sale. Each one being a totally seperate transaction. One having nothing to do with the other.

    @restequi wrote:

    So you say get the property into a trust with me as the beneficiary? How about the homeowners are they also beneficiary? So who would be the trustee in this transaction?.. What happens to the assignment of beneficial interest and all that stuff..?

    Yes, you and the “Seller”/Owner are both beneficiaries of the Trust. Your Trustee should be an unassociated third party, like an Attorney or an organization such as Equity Holding Corp.

    @restequi wrote:

    So from here you are getting a short sale package together for the lender.. And how are you negotiating so call to terms or purchase price..? Are you writing a purchase and sales agreement for the amount you???re willing to pay and have the owners sign it..? If not what method do you use to extract this price that they will accept? So maybe you???ll counter back and forth a couple times with the lender and finally arrive in at a price that the lender will accept.. If you are writing an offer / P&S what do you put for closing time frame 30 days 60 days 90 days etc.. And how about a deadline for the bank???s acceptance? Should this also be used ? Unless you???re using another method besides an offer and P&S somehow informally.. I get confused here a little on how this is actually done extracting the price or lowball offer, please elaborate on negotiate the terms and the essence of the offer or discount method either informal for formal, P&S, or just cover letter please explain..

    There is nothing different about this Short Sale than any other, other than a Trust will be created before you contact the lender. Get your package together, do your homework, submit your package and stay in constant contact with whomever is dealing with the account.

    Yes, your package will include approximately eight to ten different documents.

    1. Foreclosure Property Disclosure Form
    2. Seller Acknowledgements
    3. Seller Information Worksheet
    4. Real Estate Purchace Contract
    5. Seller Disclosure Statement / Condition of Property
    6. HUD1 (This is the most important one. Without a HUD the Lender wont look at your proposal)
    7. Power of Attorney
    8. Authorization to Release Information
    9. Hardship Letter

    @restequi wrote:

    I am now getting up with a short sale specialists who is supposed to negotiate these SS???s for me but I haven???t spoke to him as of yet..

    Before you make a deal with a “specialist”, make sure they know what the hell they are doing or you will be wasting time and money. Ask to see a copy of the Short Sale Package they use to send to a Lender. Don’t just take their word for it, get a copy of it. If it doesn’t contain all of these documents or more, find someone else.

    I used a service that charged me a flat fee of $1400, $500 upfront and $900 when its done. They first evaluated the deal and let me know if they thought it would fly before I had to pay them anything.

    I did just recently find a guy in my area that is really good at it and is willing to use all my documents. He’s also willing to do it for a small percentage of the deal. He works it, so I don’t have to. I can continue to find good deals and keep the pipeline full for all of us.

    @restequi wrote:

    Okay for the documents regarding the trust, & the homeowner deeding the property into a trust. So all that???s needed is the trust and the deed?

    That’s what you need first and then put together the rest of the documents before attempting to make an offer to the bank.

    @restequi wrote:

    Are you saying that to trust sells to me the end buyer with funding how then do I resell with no seasoning.. Or is it that there is a purchase by me of the trust with traditional funding, and a P&S, or bill of sale.. Please expain this part you wrote for me also.. ??? One of you paying off the loan and one of the Trust now selling the property.
    Each with full disclosure.??? (What Disclosure..?)

    Once the property is “in Trust” (the Title is vested with the Trustee) then you start your offer and negotiation process with the bank. When you have come to terms you close. Since the property is already “in Trust” and the Trustee owns the property, there is no need to “re-title” it. All you are doing is negotiating a payoff with the bank. Now just pay them off using your Hard Money. This is now a fully disclosed and completed transaction.

    Now go start your next transaction by accepting an offer from your buyer. It can be the next day or the next week. Since the Trustee owns the property, your end buyers Purchase Contract will be made to the Trustee for the price you have agreed to accept from your end buyer. Now just close that deal as a totally seperate, fully disclosed, trasaction.

    Hint: I’ve always closed on the same day or the next day. Even though I have a cheap souce of Hard Money for only my transactions, it can add up if you don’t close soon. Always have your End Buyer ready to close before you close with the bank. You should have no problem closing in the next room with minutes of your “payoff” close with the bank.

    @restequi wrote:

    Thank you guys Scott & Jerry –

    You are welcome.

    #23494
    Avatar of jerry carey
    jerry carey
    Member

    Hey Scott … could you answer my ONE question as prviously posted.

    I asked:

    If the property is already in the name of the trust … how do you get financing? Usually, the property has to be taken out of the trust’s name and put back into the name of the Beneficiary to be financed and then transferred back into the trust’s name. How do you accomplish this in the case of a Short Sale scenario?

    Thanks in advance for your help.

    Jerry Carey

    #23495

    @JCarey wrote:

    Hey Scott … could you answer my ONE question as prviously posted. I asked:If the property is already in the name of the trust … how do you get financing? Usually, the property has to be taken out of the trust’s name and put back into the name of the Beneficiary to be financed and then transferred back into the trust’s name. How do you accomplish this in the case of a Short Sale scenario?
    Jerry Carey

    I thought I did answer it. If you are the current Owner/Settlor and you just want to “refinance”, most lenders will want you to take it out of Trust, refinance, and then put it back in Trust. However, if you are SELLING IT then you just instruct the Trustee to accept the offer and “SELL IT” from the Trust.

    A new buyer is not financing the property while in Trust. They are simply buying it from the owner, which is the Trustee. Its the same as any other sale.

    With regard to how to do this with a Short Sale, please read my previous post above. I went step-by-step through the process for you.

    Most Lenders and Title Companies will require you to pay off the existing encumbrances first before you can sell the property to an end buyer. You will probably have to use Hard Money to do this since getting a conventional loan may prevent you from reselling the property for 3 to 12 months.

    1. Seller places property in trust
    2. Names you a beneficiary
    3. You then negotiate a Short Sale
    4. If accepted, use hard money to pay off the loan
    5. Then direct the Trustee to sell the property to your end buyer

    You can negotiate the pay off while the property is in Trust. Since the Trust/Trustee still owns the property there is no Title change. All you are doing is negotiating a pay off of the loan/s.

    Now just sell the propert from the Trust and the difference between your Hard Money + % and the End Buyer Purchase Price is your profit.

    #23496
    Avatar of jerry carey
    jerry carey
    Member

    Hello Scott:
    First … thank you for your patience in this matter. I’m still having a problem understanding the “mechanics of the transaction” … not the procedure.

    You stated:

    Most Lenders and Title Companies will require you to pay off the existing encumbrances first before you can sell the property to an end buyer. You will probably have to use Hard Money to do this since getting a conventional loan may prevent you from reselling the property for 3 to 12 months.

    Are you saying that a hard money lender will fund a loan to me without the property ever being titled in my personal name? I’m obtaining the payoff loan based on my credit, but the title as you stated remains in the name of the Trust, of which I am a Co-Beneficiary! Typically, lenders will not loan money on property titled in the name of the Trust and it must be transfered out of the name of the Trust. This is the “mechanical” part of the process that I don’t understand. If loan is NOT funded in the name of the Trust … were back to simutaneous closings, seasoning issues, and possible loan fraud!

    Thanks again for your clarification.

    Jerry Carey

    #23497

    Yes, that is exactly what I’m saying. Some “HM” Lenders will loan on the deal, not your credit, especially when the End Buyer is in the next room ready to close sothey can be paid back at the close of the End Buyers closing and their money never leaves escrow.

    Remember, the Trustee already owns the property, all you need to do is have funds to payoff the negotiated balance and you can,t use the End Buyer’s so you have to use you own or har money.

    Getting a conventional loan won’t work for couple reasons…

    This would now require you to have to take it out of trust and buy directly in to your own name which would also result in a “chain of title” issue and would then reqiure you to have to wait 90 days or more before you can resell or flip the property.

    Using Private or Hard Money would not require the property to be reconveyed out of trust first. Thus allowing you to pay off the negootiated encumbrances and direct the Trustee to sell the property to your End Buyer.

    You fully close in one room with the Lender and then in a totally separate transaction, close in the next room with your End Buyer. This eliminates any chain of title issues with the lenders since placing of ones own property in to a trust is not considered by a lender to be a title seasoning issue.

    The End Buyer from the beginning makes an offer to the true owner of the property, which is the Trustee. His/Her lender sees a valid Purchase Contract for $X.XX?

    #23498
    Avatar of areyes
    areyes
    Member

    great stuff guys. learned a couple of new stuff today from this thread.

    #23499

    Now that’s what we like to hear!

    Thanks

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